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Graduate Student Research Experiences

The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides well-rounded laboratory experiences that expand graduate students’ expertise beyond the traditional university setting. Some graduate students come to ORISE looking for the right setting to conduct their thesis research; some are master’s students preparing to pursue their doctorates; some are looking for a program to help fund their education; others seek or a short-term experience, like a summer internship.

The diverse collection of programs available to graduate students meet a variety of needs across many different career paths.

Experiences of graduate participants are highlighted in the following profiles and videos:

Anna Bruton

Anna Bruton

Anna Bruton spent the summer of 2009 at Howard University researching the responsiveness of law-enforcement officers during and after Hurricane Katrina.

Emily Fischer

Emily Fischer

Emily Fischer was a participant in the Global Change Education Program (GCEP), which was established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to promote undergraduate and graduate training in support of DOE's global change research activities.

Yashema Mack

Yashema Mack

Florida A&M student Yashema Mack analyzed data from the world’s fastest supercomputer, putting her computer skills to use for nuclear technology advancement at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Benjamin Martin

Benjamin Martin

University of Tennessee student Benjamin Martin is trying to improve emergency response by developing computer codes to fuse together two different kinds of satellite image data.

Benjamin Snyder

Benjamin Snyder

Benjamin Snyder is using his stint at the National Energy and Technology Laboratory in Pittsburgh, Pa., to develop his skills in geographic information systems. Using mapping, he helps locate the best sites for natural gas drilling in the Marcellus Shale.

Augusto Tentori

Augusto Tentori

Augusto Tentori, a participant in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Scholarship and Fellowship Program, used his expertise in microfluidics to help develop a prototype device for human radiation exposure detection.