ORISE wants to help parents engage students in STEM this holiday season with easy, affordable science experiments that keep everyone in the holly, jolly spirit.

Dec 20, 2017

The holidays have arrived, which means students are at home struggling to stay on the Nice List and a there’s a gap in learning until the New Year. ORISE wants to help parents engage students in STEM this holiday season with easy, affordable science experiments that keep everyone in the holly, jolly spirit. There are four ORISE Holiday Science experiments to choose from: “Dissolving Candy Cane,” “Christmas Scented Wrapping Paper,” “Christmas Chromatography,” and “Christmas Elephant Toothpaste.” Each experiment is safe to do at home, and can be altered for K-12 students of all ages and on different academic levels. The videos listed under each experiment provide full how-to tutorials for parents who want to follow an ORISE instructor while working with students. For a quicker briefing on each experiment, the links below include the material list and experiment instructions. Share your Holiday Science experiments with ORISE by tagging us in photos or video on ORISE’s Facebook or Twitter. Happy holidays and happy experimenting from ORISE!

Media Contacts

Pam Bonee
Director, Communications
Office: 865.576.3146
Phone: 865.603.5142
pam.bonee@orau.org

Wendy West
Manager, Communications
Office: 865.576.0028
Phone: 865.207.7953
wendy.west@orau.org

The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) asset that is dedicated to enabling critical scientific, research, and health initiatives of the department and its laboratory system by providing world class expertise in STEM workforce development, scientific and technical reviews, and the evaluation of radiation exposure and environmental contamination. 

ORISE is managed by ORAU, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation and federal contractor, for DOE’s Office of Science. The single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, the Office of Science is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit science.energy.gov.