U.S. Department of Energy

2020 Occupational Radiation Exposure Dashboard

Welcome to the interactive data explorer that allows users to quickly examine information on occupational radiation exposure information at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this tool is for users to be able to walk through the standard metrics and information collected by the Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) in an interactive, organized, and inter-related series of graphics to provide a comprehensive overview of radiation exposure at DOE.

To interact with the data explorer, hover over any of the graphics on the screen and click on your selection for more information. Once the selected graphic is open, roll the cursor over data to enable a pop-up screen with more detailed information. When you have completed your review of the graphic, please click on the 'back' button located in the bottom left-hand corner of the graphic.

If you have any comments, questions, or suggestions concerning this tool, please contact Katharine McLellan at DOE Office of ES&H Reporting and Analysis (AU-23) at katharine.mclellan@hq.doe.gov.

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Radiation Exposure Monitoring System

Query Tool

The REMS Query Tool is intended to provide quick and easy access to summary information on radiation exposure at DOE facilities. A query tool such as this is often referred to as a "Data Mart". A simple 4-step process allows the user to view and extract the most commonly requested information on occupational exposure from 1986 to the present.

  1. Select the data items of interest
  2. Select the data filters, such as a range of years, a specific site, or a reporting organization
  3. Group the data to sum it in the order of your preference
  4. View the results in a table format, or download as an Excel file

The REMS Query Tool is updated each year as annual data is collected from the sites or when the sites submit updated records. It is therefore the best place to access the most up-to-date occupational exposure data.

REMS Query Tool

During 2020

Increases in the dose and number of individuals with measurable dose were the result of increased activities involving radioactive materials, particularly at the DOE sites that comprise the majority of DOE collective dose.

  • DOE facilities continued to comply with DOE dose limits and ACL and worked to minimize exposure to individuals.
  • The majority (62 percent) of facilities cited the COVID-19 pandemic as limiting operational activities.
  • The number of individuals with measurable dose increased by 27% from a value of 13,824 in CY 2019 to a value of 17,329 in CY 2020.
  • The collective TED decreased at DOE by less than 1 percent from 752.3 person‑rem (7,523 person‑mSv) in CY 2019 to 750.8 person‑rem (7,508 person‑mSv) in CY 2020.
  • The collective CED (predominately internal exposure to U-234) increased by 10 percent from 50.5 person-rem (505 person-mSv) in CY 2019 to 56.1 person-rem (561 person-mSv) in CY 2020.

Over the past 5 years

The collective TED increased 7 percent from 708 person-rem (7,080 person-mSv) in CY 2016 to 761 person-rem (7,610 person-mSv) in CY 2017, mainly due to the resumption of programmatic work at LANL and WIPP after a work pause. In CY 2018, collective TED continued to increase at LANL as more programmatic work resumed from the work pause. In CY 2019, the collective TED for DOE decreased by less than 1 percent or 1.1 person rem (110 person-mSv). In CY 2020, the collective TED for DOE decreased by less than 1 percent or 1.5 person-rem (15 person-mSv). Additionally, the majority (62 percent) of DOE facilities cited the COVID-19 pandemic as limiting operational activities in CY 2020.
  • For 4 of the past 5 years, the collective dose was above the 5-year average of 745.2 rem.
  • For CY 2020, 48% of the DOE workforce was monitored for radiation dose, and 27% of monitored individuals received a measurable dose.
  • The number of individuals with measurable dose increased 44 percent (increased by 5,346 individuals) over the past 5 years.
  • The collective TED increased by 6 percent (increased by 42 person-rem) from CY 2016 to CY 2020.
  • Collective internal CED decreased by 9 percent (decreased by 5.5 person-rem) over the past 5 years.

Historical perspective

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historical-perspective.png                                                                                      

Note: Scroll over the bar for each year to see changes with respect to the Sites, Policy, or Geopolitical.

The average and collective dose at DOE facilities has experienced a dramatic (91 percent) decrease coinciding with the end of the Cold War era, due to:

  • The DOE mission shift from weapons production to stabilization, waste management, and environmental remediation activities;
  • Consolidation and remediation of facilities across the complex to meet the new mission; and
  • Improved regulations with an increased focus on ALARA practices and risk reduction.

Note: click on graph for detailed information

Components of TED

Components of TED

Collective CED by Radionuclide

Collective CED by Radionuclide

Average Measurable TED

Average Measurable TED

Air Sampling Measurements

Air Sampling Measurements

Bioassay Measurements

Bioassay Measurements

Number of Individuals with Measurable CED, Collective CED, and Average Measurable CED

Number of Individuals with Measurable CED, Collective CED, and Average Measurable CED
DOE Complex Wide
Site Data

Collective TED by Site

Collective TED by Site

Site Dose Data Comparison

Site Dose Data Comparison

Components of TED

Components of TED                              
  • The collective TED decreased less than 1 percent from 752 person-rem (7,520 person-mSv) in CY 2019 to 751 person‑rem (7,510 person-mSv) in CY 2020.
  • The internal dose component of the collective TED increased by 10.4 percent from 50.8 person‑rem (508 person‑mSv) in CY 2019 to 56.1 person‑rem (561 person‑mSv) in CY 2020, due to increases at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Y‑12 National Security Complex (Y‑12). 
  • The collective photon dose decreased by 3 percent from 548.2 person‑rem (5,482 person‑mSv) in CY 2019 to 529.6 person‑rem (5,296 person‑mSv) in CY 2020.
  • The neutron component of the collective TED increased by 8 percent from 153.4 person‑rem (1,534 person‑mSv) in CY 2019 to 165.1 person‑rem (1,651 person‑mSv) in CY 2020.  The increase resulted primarily from increases in collective neutron dose at Pantex.
  • Twenty-three of the 35 DOE sites reported decreases in the collective TED from the CY 2019 values, and 12 of the 35 DOE sites reported increases in the collective TED from the CY 2019 values.
  • The five sites that contributed most (88 percent) of the DOE collective TED in CY 2020 were (in descending order of collective TED):  LANL—31 percent; Savannah River—17 percent (including Savannah River National Laboratory and Savannah River Site [SRS]); Pantex—15 percent; Oak Ridge—14 percent (including East Tennessee Technology Park [ETTP], Y-12, ORNL, and Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education [ORISE]); and Idaho—11 percent (including Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project [AMWTP], Idaho Cleanup Project [ICP], and Idaho National Laboratory [INL]).

Collective CED by Radionuclide

Collective CED by Radionuclide      

Scroll over text for additional information

  • Uranium-234 (U‑234) accounted for the largest percentage of the collective CED
  • Over 95% of this dose was accrued at Y-12 due to Enriched Uranium Operations

Number of Individuals with Measurable CED, Collective CED, and Average Measurable CED

Number of Individuals with Measurable CED, Collective CED, and Average Measurable CED      
  • The number of individuals with measurable CED decreased by 8 percent from 1,413 in CY 2019 to 1,303 in CY 2020, while the collective CED increased by 10 percent.
  • The average measurable CED increased from 0.036 rem (0.360 mSv) in CY 2019 to 0.043 rem (0.430 mSv) in CY 2020, but remained below the 5-year average measurable CED.
  • Ninety-one percent of the collective CED in CY 2020 was from uranium intakes at Y-12 during the operation and management of Enriched Uranium Operations facilities at the site.

Average Measurable TED

Average Measurable TED          
  • The average measurable dose to DOE workers, a key radiation dose indicator, is calculated by dividing the collective TED by the number of individuals with measurable dose.
  • The average measurable TED decreased from 0.054 rem (0.540 mSv) in CY 2019 to 0.043 rem (0.430 mSv) in CY 2020.

Air Sampling Measurements

Air Sampling Measurements  
  • The majority of the measurements reported as “Air Sampling” accounted for 15 percent of the total measurements.
  • Pantex Plant had the largest percentage increase in the number of “Air Sampling” measurements, increasing from 0 air sample measurements in CY 2019 to 505 air sample measurements in CY 2020.

Note: The numbers shown are based on the number of measurements taken and not the number of individuals monitored. Measurements reported in "Air Sampling" are used to calculate the amount of airborne radioactive material taken into the body and the resultant internal dose.

Bioassay Measurements

Bioassay Measurements      
  • Three sites—Hanford, SRS, and Oak Ridge—accounted for 85 percent of the “In Vivo” measurements.
  • Seventy-four percent of the “Urinalysis” measurements in CY 2020 were performed at four sites:  Y-12, LANL, SRS, and Hanford Site.
  • LANL had the largest percentage increase (1,221 percent) in the number of “Urinalysis” measurements in CY 2020, increasing from 473 urinalysis measurements in CY 2019 to 6,251 urinalysis measurements in CY 2020.
  • Y-12 performed the largest number of bioassay and air sampling measurements combined, comprising 32 percent of the total measurements taken.

Note: The numbers shown are based on the number of measurements taken and not the number of individuals monitored. The measurements reported as “In Vivo” include direct measurements of the radioactive material in the body of the monitored person. Examples of “In Vivo” measurements include whole body counts and lung or thyroid counts.

Collective TED by Site

Collective TED by Site                                                                      

Site Dose Data Comparison

  2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Site Collective Ted
(person-rem)
Percent Change from 2015 Collective Ted
(person-rem)
Percent Change from 2016 Collective Ted
(person-rem)
Percent Change from 2017 Collective Ted
(person-rem)
Percent Change from 2018 Collective Ted
(person-rem)
Percent Change from 2019
Ames Laboratory Ames Laboratory is a government-owned, contractor-operated research facility of the DOE. For over 65 years, the Ames Laboratory has sought solutions to energy-related problems through the exploration of chemical, engineering, materials, mathematical, and physical sciences. 1.240 -1% 1.053 -15% 0.935 0.837 0.777
Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is one of the U.S. Department of Energy's largest national laboratories for scientific and engineering research. The lab’s mission is to apply a unique mix of world-class science, engineering, and user facilities to deliver innovative research and technologies. The principal radiological facilities at Argonne are the Advanced Photon Source, a superconducting heavy-ion linear accelerator (LINAC), a 22-MeV pulsed electron LINAC, and several other charged-particle accelerators. 13.080 -12% 9.885 -24% 7.174 -27% 8.650 21% 4.609 -47%
Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) conducts research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, as well as in energy technologies and national security. BNL also builds and operates major scientific facilities which are available to university, industry, and government researchers. 3.217 -4% 6.076 89% 3.924 -35% 3.191 -19% 1.161 -64%
Energy Technology Engineering Center The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) is located within area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory. The laboratory comprises four discrete operational areas with two adjacent undeveloped properties. In CY 1988, DOE decided to close the remaining ETEC operations. ETEC is currently in a safe shutdown mode, pending the completion of the Environmental Impact Statement. 0.089 0.026 0.059 0.009 0.045
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Fermilab provides leadership and resources for qualified researchers to conduct basic research at the frontiers of high-energy particle physics and related disciplines. The primary features of the site include the accelerator complex and associated building infrastructure, an interconnected industrial cooling water system, a housing complex for visiting researchers, row crop agriculture, and natural areas in various states of restoration. 11.930 -28% 10.210 -14% 9.980 -2% 7.060 -29% 7.850 11%
Grand Junction The Grand Junction disposal site was transferred to the Office of Legacy Management in CY 2003. Legacy Management manages the site according to a site-specific Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan.     0.010 0.336 0.041 0.043
Hanford:                    
Hanford Site The United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site sits on 586 square miles in the desert of southeastern Washington State. The area is home to nine former nuclear reactors and their associated processing facilities that were built beginning in CY 1943. Hanford reactors produced plutonium from CY 1944 until 1987. Today, Hanford workers are involved in an environmental cleanup project and remediation of the site. 41.095 -34% 27.003 -34% 27.008 0% 32.673 21% 9.797 -70%
Office of River Protection The DOE ORP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. The chemical and radioactive waste is currently stored in 171 large underground tanks. ORP and its contractors are removing and transferring this waste from the older single-shell tanks to the newer double-shell tanks. This transfer of waste is to reduce the environmental risk posed by the older tanks. The cornerstone of the tank waste cleanup project is the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The WTP will use a technology called vitrification to immobilize chemical and radioactive waste in an exceptionally sturdy form of glass to isolate it from the environment. 37.102 -4% 24.387 -34% 24.926 2% 24.153 -3% 13.291 -45%
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Located in Richland, Washington, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is 1 of 10 national laboratories managed by DOE’s Office of Science (SC). The laboratory provides the facilities, unique scientific equipment, and world-renowned scientists and engineers to strengthen U.S. scientific foundations through fundamental research and innovation. The lab also supports Hanford site cleanup efforts by performing scientific and technical evaluations and reviews, and developing and advancing new technologies to address site cleanup challenges. 11.599 -8% 13.555 17% 12.225 -10% 9.717 -21% 8.523 -12%
Idaho Site The primary focus of activites at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is nuclear energy research and development. The DOE Idaho office oversees three major contracts to ensure that operations and research activities are carried out safely, and in compliance with laws, regulations, and contract provisions. The Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) focuses on addressing legacy wastes resulting from decades of widely-varied work including conventional weapons testing, government-owned research and power reactor development and testing, spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, laboratory research, and defense missions. 92.670 -25% 79.008 -15% 86.799 10% 76.511 -12% 80.518 5%
Kansas City National Security Campus The NNSA Kansas City National Security Campus (KC-NSC) is responsible for manufacturing and procuring non-nuclear components for nuclear weapons, including electronic, mechanical, and engineered material components. It supports national laboratories, universities, and U.S. industry and is located in Kansas City, Missouri. 0.063 0.171 0.428 0.364 0.493
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) is a member of the national laboratory system supported by DOE through its Office of Science and is charged with conducting unclassified research across a wide range of scientific disciplines. LBNL employs approximately 4,200 scientists, engineers, support staff, and students. 0.823 1.257 53% 1.014 -19% 1.810 79% 0.834
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a DOE facility operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC management team, which includes Bechtel, the University of California, BWX Technologies, Washington Group, and Battelle. The site serves as a national resource of scientific, technical, and engineering capability with a special focus on national security. LLNL’s mission encompasses such areas as: strategic defense, energy, the environment, biomedicine, technology transfer, education, counter-terrorism, and emergency response. The types of radioactive materials range from tritium to transuranic (TRU); the quantities of each range from nanocuries (i.e., normal environmental background values) to kilocuries. 8.215 1% 6.947 -15% 8.691 25% 11.003 27% 7.494 -32%
Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducts radiological operations in active facilities, storage facilities, facilities with legacy radiological concerns, in addition to operations in inactive facilities and areas destined for decommissioning. Radiological activities include programmatic and production work; facility construction, modification, and maintenance; and research, development, and testing. 95.565 -2% 160.772 68% 207.051 29% 224.472 8% 232.736 4%
National Renewable Energy Laboratory The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) focuses on creative answers to today's energy challenges. From fundamental science and energy analysis to validating new products for the commercial market, NREL researchers are dedicated to transforming the way the world uses energy. With more than 35 years of successful innovation in energy efficiency and renewable energy, NREL discoveries provide sustainable alternatives for powering homes, businesses, and transportation systems. 0.034 0.020 0.006 0.001 0.030
Nevada National Security Site The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is located approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. It is a remote facility that covers approximately 1,375 square miles of land. The NNSS has been the primary location for testing nuclear experiments in the continental United States since CY 1951. 3.295 -35% 3.858 17% 3.893 1% 1.940 -50% 1.800 -7%
New Brunswick Laboratory The New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) is a Government-owned, Government-operated center of excellence in the measurement science of nuclear materials. Specific operations involving radioactive material include destructive and nondestructive measurements of nuclear materials including plutonium and uranium. Additionally, NBL conducts research to develop improved measurement technology applied to nuclear materials and management of interlaboratory measurement evaluation programs. 0.096                
Oak Ridge:                    
East Tennessee Technology Park The East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) was originally named the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. As part of the Manhattan Project, the plant was designed to produce enriched uranium for use in atomic weapons operations during World War II. After the war, this Plant was renamed the Oak Ridge K-25 Site and produced enriched uranium for the commercial nuclear power industry from CY 1945 to 1985. In CY 1987, DOE renamed the site ETTP and began a major environmental cleanup project with the long-term goal of converting ETTP into a private industrial park. 0.114 0.093 0.147 0.186 0.751
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education ORISE is a DOE institute focusing on scientific initiatives to research health risks from occupational hazards, assess environmental cleanup, respond to radiation medical emergencies, support national security and emergency preparedness, and educate the next generation of scientists. 0.171 0.243 0.317 0.237 0.000
Oak Ridge National Laboratory ORNL is a multiprogramming science and technology laboratory. ORNL’s mission is to deliver scientific discoveries and technical breakthroughs that will accelerate the development and deployment of solutions in clean energy and global security, and in doing so create economic opportunity for the nation. ORNL also performs other work for the DOE, including isotope production, information management, and technical program management, and provides research and technical assistance to other organizations. 69.378 16% 87.621 26% 76.833 -12% 70.245 -9% 47.666 -32%
Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 is one of four production facilities in the NNSA Nuclear Security Enterprise. The facility’s emphasis is the processing and storage of uranium and development of technologies associated with those activities. Y-12 maintains the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile and processes highly enriched uranium for the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program. 72.752 25% 75.761 4% 65.917 -13% 61.751 -9% 58.768 -5%
Office of Secure Transportation The Office of Secure Transportation (OST) is the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) organization tasked to provide secure ground transportation of nuclear weapons, special nuclear material (SNM), nuclear weapon components, and nuclear explosive-like assemblies. OST operates both secure ground transporters and Federal aircraft, which make up the Transportation Safeguards System (TSS). The TSS Federal Agent and vehicle maintenance facilities are located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Amarillo, Texas, and Albuquerque, New Mexico. The OST Administrative Headquarters are located at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. 0.072 0.311 0.288 0.448 0.025
Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is located 3 miles south of the Ohio River and is 12 miles west of Paducah, Kentucky. The plant began enriching uranium in CY 1952, first for the nation's nuclear weapons program and then for nuclear fuel for commercial power plants. In CY 1994, the enrichment facilities were leased to United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). In August 2013, USEC notified DOE that they were discontinuing enrichment operations and planning to de-lease the enrichment facilities. 6.201 -12% 5.159 -17% 4.593 -11% 5.554 21% 2.654 -52%
Pantex Plant The DOE/NNSA Pantex Plant is the nation’s primary facility for the final assembly, disassembly, and maintenance of nuclear weapons. The last new nuclear weapon was completed in CY 1991. Since then, Pantex has safely dismantled thousands of weapons retired from the stockpile by the military and placed the resulting plutonium pits in interim storage. Pantex has approximately 650 buildings, including specialized facilities in which maintenance, modification, disassembly, and assembly operations are conducted. 25.918 15% 24.986 -4% 22.927 -8% 24.248 6% 113.909 370%
Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is located in Pike County, Ohio. PORTS was one of three large gaseous diffusion plants initially constructed to produce enriched uranium to support the nation’s nuclear weapons program and later enrich uranium for commercial nuclear reactors. The plant has been shut down and is currently undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). 2.509 -47% 2.553 2% 3.588 41% 4.289 20% 3.712 -13%
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is a collaborative national center for fusion energy research. The Laboratory advances the coupled fields of fusion energy and plasma physics research and with collaborators, is developing the scientific understanding and key innovations needed to realize fusion as an energy source for the world. 0.311 0.361 0.239 0.391 0.234
Sandia National Laboratory Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) primary mission is ensuring the U.S. nuclear arsenal is safe, secure, and reliable, and can fully support our nation's deterrence policy. Sandia is the engineering arm of the U.S. nuclear weapons enterprise. Sandia’s foundation is science-based engineering, in which fundamental science, computer models, and unique experimental facilities come together so researchers can understand, predict, and verify weapon systems performance. 2.756 -48% 2.146 -22% 5.819 171% 5.323 -9% 3.287 -38%
Savannah River:                    
Savannah River Site The Savannah River Site (SRS) was constructed during the early 1950s to produce the basic materials used in the fabrication of nuclear weapons, primarily tritium and plutonium-239, in support of our nation’s defense programs. Five reactors were built to produce these materials. Also built were a number of support facilities including two chemical separations plants, a heavy water extraction plant, a nuclear fuel and target fabrication facility, a tritium extraction facility, and waste management facilities. 98.980 4% 152.495 54% 126.869 -17% 126.763 0% 112.247 -11%
Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) began reporting separately from SRS effective CY 2016. SRNL supports DOE in its environmental management and nuclear security missions. SRNL applies its expertise in nuclear chemical manufacturing to assist DOE in meeting its objectives in areas, such as nuclear waste cleanup and defense nonproliferation. 12.358 20.051 62% 8.463 -58% 16.631 97% 11.717 -30%
Separations Process Research Unit The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) is located at Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory based in upstate New York. Built in the 1940s, the buildings supported the SPRU mission to research the chemical process to extract plutonium from irradiated materials. Although equipment was flushed and drained and bulk waste was removed following the shutdown of the facilities in CY 1953, residual materials are present in the tanks, buildings H2 and G2, and interconnecting pipe tunnels. The site is currently undergoing a variety of cleanup activities, including demolition, decontamination, and remediation. 47.541 -31% 5.185 -89% 0.208 0.029 0.000
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) which opened in CY 1962, is 1 of 10 DOE Office of Science laboratories and is operated by Stanford University on behalf of DOE. Originally a premier high-energy particle accelerator laboratory, SLAC has grown into a state-of-the-art photon science laboratory. SLAC's scientific mission has diversified from an original focus on particle physics and accelerator science to include cosmology, materials and environmental sciences, biology, chemistry, and alternative energy research. 0.170 0.057 0.047 0.206 0.146
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) is one of 17 national laboratories funded by DOE. TJNAF’s primary mission is to conduct basic research of the atom's nucleus using the unique particle accelerator known as the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). 0.777 0.270 0.526 1.266 0.607
Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project The Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action Project (UMTRA) site is located approximately 3 miles northwest of Moab in Grand County, Utah, and includes a former uranium-ore processing facility. The site encompasses 480 acres, of which approximately 130 acres are covered by a uranium mill tailings pile. The UMTRA Project ships four trainloads of tailings to the Crescent Junction Disposal Site each week. The trains contain 144 containers of approximately 40 tons each, or a total of 23,040 tons of tailings per week. Tailing shipments began in April 2009 and are expected to continue through CY 2034. 7.044 -2% 5.656 -20% 5.485 -3% 9.748 78% 12.004 23%
Waste Isolation Pilot Plant The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is located in the Chihuahuan Desert near Carlsbad, New Mexico. This DOE facility safely disposes of the nation's defense-related transuranic radioactive waste. WIPP began disposal operations in March 1999. 0.311 0.279 0.909 1.113 1.130 2%
West Valley Demonstration Project The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) is a unique operation within DOE and came into being through the WVDP Act of 1980. The Act requires DOE to be responsible for solidifying the high-level waste and disposing of waste created by the solidification and decommissioning of the facilities used in the process. The land and facilities are not owned by DOE; rather, the project premises are the property of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and represent only 200 acres of the larger Western New York Service Center, which is approximately 3,300 acres, also owned by NYSERDA. After DOE's responsibilities under the Act are complete, the Act requires that the premises be returned to New York State. 41.122 46% 33.653 -18% 35.549 6% 20.459 -42% 8.868 -57%
Service Center Personnel* 0.268 0.091 0.149 0.996 3.116
Totals 708.866 -5% 761.209 7% 753.322 -1% 752.315 0% 750.842 0%
  • Note: Bold and boxed values indicate the greatest value in each column.
  • ◊ The percentage change from the previous year is not shown because it is not meaningful when the site collective dose is less than 1 person-rem (10 person-mSv).
  • * Includes service center personnel from smaller facilities not associated with a DOE site.