Undergraduate Scholarships ORISE offers scholarship opportunities to all undergraduate students

The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education offers a chance to earn scholarships to all undergraduate students. Students can earn funding toward their education through various STEM-based scholarship opportunities promoted by ORISE.

Carbon Dioxide Removal: Reducing our Footprint

Competition Opens: Saturday, October 1st, 2022

Deadline: on or before 11:59 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, Wednesday, November 30th, 2022

The Department of Energy (DOE) launched the Carbon Negative Shot to advance the development of the emerging and necessary carbon dioxide removal industry. Carbon dioxide removal (CDR) plays a critical role in helping the United States address the current climate crisis, as well as achieve net-zero emissions by 2050. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) facilitated the DOE Carbon Negative Shot Summit in May 2022 to increase collaboration on this effort. Despite the many efforts that have been made so far towards CDR, there is still a lot of work to be done.

To continue that work, ORISE is hosting a research-based challenge for undergraduate students! The challenge is for students to develop an infographic to communicate the current leading ways to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Thorough submissions will include research on at least four current carbon dioxide removal methods, as well as research on new developments in carbon dioxide removal. Your infographic could win you a $5,000 scholarship! The deadline for this competition is Wednesday, November 30, 2022, and winners will be announced late-December.

Prizes:

1st place:  $5,000 scholarship

2nd place:  $3,000 scholarship

3rd place: $1,000 scholarship

The Problem:

The world is facing an urgent need to stop the increase of atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) levels and their devastating impact of climate change. In order to reach our global climate goals, extensive amounts of CO2 must be removed from our atmosphere every year by mid-century. The DOE hosted the Carbon Negative Shot Summit to increase collaboration on this effort and to open up a door that is essential to moving towards our goal.

Your task:

Develop an infographic to communicate to the public the current leading ways to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Thorough submissions will include recent scientific and technological research and developments in carbon dioxide removal, as well as research on new developments in carbon dioxide removal. You must provide supporting evidence, using footnotes for citations on the infographic, and have a supporting document with additional information.

Details:

  • To be eligible for this scholarship, you must currently be enrolled as an undergraduate student at a college or university and must be enrolled as an undergraduate student at a college or university in the next consecutive semester.
    • This scholarship will not apply to your current semester, but to the next semester in which you are enrolled.
    • If you are a senior and will be graduating as an undergraduate student at the end of your current semester, you are not eligible for this undergraduate scholarship.
  • A submission should include the following:
    • 1) Communication of the chosen activity; background info; and why others should use it in the form of an infographic; and
    • 2) Supporting document with additional information and citations.
  • Entries must be submitted on the following form: https://orausurvey.orau.org/n/2022FallUndergrad.aspx
  • All entries will be scored on a rubric.
  • You can read about the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) support to the DOE clean energy summit
  • Information on carbon dioxide removal from the Department of Energy (DOE) can be found here.
  • Use of additional sources is encouraged.
  • Entries should convey accurate information appropriately to the general public.
  • Explore ORISE internships and fellowships HERE!

How to Enter:

    

View past scholarship opportunities and winners

Quantum information science and technology (QIST) is an emerging field of study that helps to explain the world around us at the smallest level.  It is based on quantum mechanics which describes how the particles that make up atoms work and is often described as strange or even spooky. How can we communicate quantum science in a way that is accessible to everyone?

ORISE is hosting a research-based challenge for undergraduate students! The challenge is for students to create a video for a hypothetical museum exhibit to teach the public the basics and applications of QIST. Include research on new developments in quantum science and technologies, as well as information about how the applications of quantum science can or will affect our everyday lives. Your video could win you a $5,000 scholarship!

Winners:

The Problem:

Informal education is needed to help the public develop an understanding of quantum science. This emerging field focuses on tiny particles which are the building blocks of matter, but can be used to build the most precise clocks in the world, sense tiny changes in gravitational fields beneath the surface of the earth, or navigate in GPS-denied environments. An understanding of quantum science will be useful in exploring physics, biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, and a host of other fields. However, many people find quantum science a daunting subject and therefore don’t explore it.

Your task:

Imagine that you have been asked by your local science museum to help to clarify the mystery surrounding quantum science and applications by developing a video for their new quantum science exhibit. Create a 4-6 minute video to communicate a key concept or important basic elements of quantum science to the public. Thorough submissions will include background information, applications of quantum science, recent scientific and technological research and developments in quantum mechanics, as well as information on how quantum science can or will affect our lives every day. You must provide supporting evidence and have a supporting document with citations from your research.

The Department of Energy (DOE) is investing $25 million to focus on polymer upcycling and plastic waste reuse. This research aims to develop technologies that will increase the use of plastic waste and lower the expense associated with plastic production. Polymer upcycling has the potential to convert plastic waste into chemical, fuels, and other valuable products. This plastic waste can be collected through recycling efforts.

Recycling, in the public eye, seems to be a modern concept with new machines being used to recycle waste, however the origin of recycling is centuries old. Recycling has evolved from being an in-home process out of necessity, to being a process valued by businesses, schools, and the government.

The Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (ORISE) is hosting a research based challenge for undergraduate students! The challenge is for students to develop a website on plastic recycling. Students will research their schools’ current process for recycling plastic and then design/create a strategy to make the process more efficient. Thorough submissions will include further research on the plastic recycling process, benefits of current recycling methods, and process improvement ideas. Your website could win you a $5,000 scholarship!

Winners:

The Problem:

According to National Geographic the world generates at least 3.5 million tons of plastic and other solid waste a day. This is 10 times the amount the world produced a century ago. Waste negatively effects our natural environment and this negative impact continues to grow. Awareness needs to be brought to recycling and upcycling efforts. DOE is doing its part to mitigate the lasting effects of plastic waste buildup through new research and development into upcycling polymers. Many communities have developed recycling programs to help with energy efficiency and preserving our natural environment.

Your task:

Create a website to inform the public on recycling and how it is done at your school. Submissions should include recent scientific research on recycling, as well as possible enhancements to recycling programs at your school. You must provide supporting evidence using citations in your website.

More than 700 undergraduate students participate in ORISE internships and research placements each year. Many of these participants are now doing their research from home due to the pandemic. The transition from normal social activities to working and learning from home has taken a toll on American society.

Prior to the pandemic, “crisis” was a common term used among researchers and experts when discussing the mental state of college students. According to 2018 and 2019 student surveys from the American College Health Association (ACHA), about 60% of respondents felt "overwhelming" anxiety, while 40% experienced depression so severe they had difficulty functioning. The additional stress of a pandemic and the move to virtual learning and working has only exasperated the problem. One way to better mental health is creating healthy habits.

ORISE is hosting a hands-on challenge for undergraduate students! The challenge is for students to research healthy habits for good mental health; commit to one healthy habit for 21 days; and develop either an infographic or podcast detailing the research and experience. The infographic or podcast should discuss your healthy habit and why other students should (or should not) use your method to better their own mental health. Your infographic or podcast could win you a $5,000 scholarship! The deadline for submitting your entry to this competition is Wednesday, March 31, 2021, and winners will be announced late-April.

The Problem:

Prior to COVID-19, college students were already experiencing a mental health crisis. In October 2020, a survey of college students found that 63% of students say that their emotional health is worse than before the COVID-19 pandemic and 56% of students are significantly concerned with their ability to care for their mental health. Furthermore, it was found that a high proportion of students are dealing with anxiety (82%), followed by social isolation/loneliness (68%), depression (63%), trouble concentrating (62%), and difficulty coping with stress in a healthy way (60%). One in five (19%) students have had suicidal thoughts in the past month.

Winners:

October 2020 Undergraduate Scholarship Competition

Water Purification: The Wave of the Future

Congratulations to the winners!

Water purification is a leading technological advancement in first world countries that is out of reach in many developing countries. UNICEF and WHO report that one in three people worldwide do not have access to safe drinking water. Although the United States has one of the safest drinking water supplies in the world, it is an ongoing challenge to protect it.

ORISE is hosting a research-based challenge for undergraduate students! The challenge is for students to develop an infographic to communicate the current leading ways to purify drinking water. Thorough submissions will include research on new developments in water purification, as well as research on providing these methods to developing countries. Your infographic could win you a $5,000 scholarship! 

The Problem:

Diseases transmitted through contaminated water are rampant throughout the world. According to the World Health Organization, more than one billion people have unsafe water globally. Unsafe water can carry diseases like typhoid fever, cholera, giardia, E. coli, hepatitis A, and many more. The United States has one of the safest drinking water supplies in the world, though it still has to be purified and protected in order to prevent rampant diseases.

Your Task:

Develop an infographic to communicate to the public the current leading ways to purify water. Thorough submissions will include recent scientific and technological research and developments in water purification, as well as research on providing these methods of water purification to developing countries. You must provide supporting evidence, using footnotes for citations on the infographic, and have a supporting document with additional information.

REAC/TS is an Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education facility with the mission to strengthen the medical response to radiological and nuclear incidents. REAC/TS has recently partnered with NASA to provide specialized knowledge for the medical community and emergency planners in the area around the upcoming Mars Rover Launch. ORISE is hosting a research-based challenge for undergraduate students to research a partner supporting NASA’s upcoming Mars 2020 Launch, learn about the partner’s capabilities, and discuss why that partner is necessary for the mission.

Winners:

The Challenge:

As many undergraduate students may recall, NASA’s Space Shuttle Program completed its mission in 2011. However, in recent years, NASA has launched an exciting, new program: Mars 2020. In this upcoming launch, NASA will be sending a rover to explore the Red Planet and search for signs of habitability and past microbial life. NASA has joined forces with many groups, including REAC/TS, an ORISE facility. Your challenge is to research a partner that is aiding NASA’s Mars 2020 Mission, learn about that partner’s capabilities, and discuss why that partner is necessary for the mission.

Autonomous and connected vehicles have the potential to improve the safety and efficiency of the transportation system. ORISE in partnership with the National Transportation Research Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is hosting a problem-based challenge for undergraduate students. The challenge for undergraduates is to develop a chart or infographic to communicate the levels of autonomous driving and sensor packages required to the public.

Winners:

The Problem: Autonomous and connected vehicles have the potential to improve the safety and efficiency of the transportation system. Vehicles that are able to automatically drive themselves in any condition or situation require a number of advanced sensors such as LIDAR, RADAR, and cameras, in addition to a fast communication network to communicate to each other and the traffic signal infrastructure in near real-time. The public is not yet generally familiar with the different levels of autonomy or the sensor packages and fidelity of the sensors needed for the different levels. In an effort to better inform the public about SAE levels of autonomous driving, what is the best way to put that information in a single chart?

The task: Develop a draft chart or infographic to communicate to the public the levels of autonomous driving and the sensor packages. You must provide supporting evidence using footnotes for citations on the chart/infographic and have a supporting document with additional information.

Technology plays a key role in many fields, but it is not without limitations. Although technology has helped to make great advancements in data collection, there are times that the instruments themselves interfere in the measurements. ORISE is hosting a problem-based challenge for undergraduate students. The challenge for undergraduates is to identify a situation in which an instrument interferes with its own measurements and data collection, and to propose a solution to the problem. 

Winners:

The Challenge:

Ed Dumas, an affiliate of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), explained a problem in using drones as an instrument to measure weather data: Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) has been making wind measurements for years using gust probes attached to fixed-wing full-scale aircraft, and this technology is well-characterized. Probes have been tested in a wind tunnel and the uncertainty in both the wind measurements made from the gust probe and the velocity and angles (pitch, roll, and heading) of the platform itself that are combined to make the final wind measurement have been accurately characterized. Because NOAA has been able to characterize the uncertainty in each of the components that comprise the wind measurement, there is confidence in the ability of the overall system to accurately measure winds with respect to the Earth.

However, similar measurements are not as well characterized from a multi-rotor platform. The biggest challenge is the disruption of the local airflow that is made by the multiple propellers used to keep the vehicle aloft. Eddies from these propellers can destroy the existing eddies in the atmosphere and severely contaminate the wind measurement. 

Drones measuring wind gusts are not the only example of an instrument interfering with its own measurements. Another example is attempting to measure absolute zero on the Kelvin scale using a thermometer. At absolute zero (-273.15 degrees Celsius), atoms stop moving. Absolute zero cannot currently be measured because the particles of the thermometer are moving, which raises the temperature of the substance being measured by keeping the atoms in motion. While this temperature difference is an insignificant amount at temperatures that we experience daily, it is a major problem when measuring absolute zero. So while the thermometer readings can approach absolute zero, the current thermometer technology is not capable of accurately measuring it.

There has been a significant increase in usage of nuclear power plants in the past 60 years, which comes along with an increased need for attention on nuclear safety. ORISE hosted a problem-based challenge for undergraduate students. The challenge for undergraduates was to develop a plan to improve nuclear safety for the future. Congratulations to our scholarship winners!

Despite living in a world of constant radiation exposure, people have a negative association with the word “radiation.” In March, ORISE hosted a problem-based challenge for undergraduate students. The challenge for undergraduates was to develop a strategic communication approach for the general public on the everyday occurrences of radiation, the benefits, risks, and safety of all types and uses of radiation.