Skip to main content

Energy Storage Summer Internships

Energy storage technology holds the key to ushering in the electric vehicle transformation and in creating the grid of the future with integrated resiliency and flexibility. Today’s battery technology is not enough. Newer chemistries, battery designs, and manufacturing processes are needed to usher changes in energy storage that can fundamentally transform the world and lead to the birth of new industries. 

As an EERE Energy Storage Intern, you can be a part of the energy storage solution we need! The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Energy Storage Internship Program offers 10-week, hands-on, practical internships at U.S. national laboratories

As an intern in the EERE Energy Storage Internship Program, you will gain a competitive edge as you apply your education, talent, and skills to research and development projects focused on energy storage. You will be mentored by and research alongside DOE scientists and subject matter experts, developing long-term relationships between yourself, researchers and others at your hosting laboratory.

The EERE Energy Storage Internship Program is sponsored by the Advanced Manufacturing Office. Learn more about why you want to apply for an AMO Summer Internship.


EERE Energy Storage Internship Details

  • Application Cycle

    AMO Summer Internships are open for applications during the Fall/Winter of each year.

    2022 Application Year

    Online Applications Open  November-December 2021 Applicants will have the opportunity to review a project catalog of projects provided by hosting facilities to find a suitable match for their interests and educational discipline. Project catalogs can be found on the respective program page. 
    Application Deadline January-March 2022
    • Applicants should not contact research facilities/mentors after the application deadline
    • Applicants may contact mentors to ask questions about projects during the application period.
    Application Review February/March 2022
    Internship Notification March/April 2022 Candidates are notified of selections and receive offer letter to accept or decline internship
    Internship Period May - September 2022

    Candidates accept their internship offer and begin their ORISE internship.

    • Interns must complete 10-weeks of internship
    • In most cases, interns will have the opportunity to collaborate with their hosting laboratory to ensure internship dates work best for the intern and mentor. However, some hosting laboratories have separate requirements for summer internship periods.

  • Application Review and Selection

    In the application process, you will review available projects for your ORISE summer internship and provide your preference for which project and mentor you want to intern with for the summer. Mentors will review complete applications and project preferences to determine their ORISE intern selections and best match for their projects. Mentors may contact you directly or schedule interviews with you as part of the review process, and we encourage you to engage with them to determine the best fit for you and your potential mentor.

    However, mentor selection is only one part of the review process. Mentor selection of your application does not guarantee you will be selected to participate in an internship program.

    After mentors have submitted their selections, ORISE, who manages the summer internship programs for EERE AMO, will review selected applications for eligibility and completeness, and provide detailed information to EERE AMO representatives. EERE AMO will make final selections based on reviewer results.

    Once selections are finalized by EERE AMO, ORISE will notify you and your mentor if you are selected for an internship program. Formal offers will be sent through Zintellect, the ORISE application and participant tracking system.

  • Eligibility

    In order to be considered, applicants must meet each of the following criteria:

    • Be a U.S. citizen.
    • Be at least 18 years old by May 1 of the internship.
    • Meet one of the following conditions:
      • Recent graduate: Have earned an undergraduate or graduate degree in the past two years in a discipline related to energy storage.
      • Undergraduate students, graduate students, and postgraduates, earning a degree in the past two years, are eligible to apply.
      • For detailed information about eligibility, review the current Zintellect Opportunity posting. [Add link]
  • Appointment Details

    • Appointments will be for 10 consecutive weeks during the months of May-September. Factors such as class schedules, housing availability, and laboratory schedules may be taken into consideration when determining appointment start and end dates.
    • An appointment involves a full-time commitment at the host laboratory with the intern in residence on-site at the specified location.
    • Interns are required to have health insurance coverage during the appointment period and to provide proof of this coverage prior to the start of the appointment.
  • Stipend and Other Benefits

    • Stipend: Based on academic level at the start of your internship appointment.

      • Undergraduate students, and post-bachelors receive $700 per week

      • Masters students or post- masters receive $900 per week

      • Doctoral students and postdoctoral receive $1000 per week

    • Travel: Travel reimbursement for inbound and outbound expenses up to a combined maximum of $2,000 if you live more than fifty miles, one-way, from your assigned hosting laboratory.
    • Housing Allowance: A housing stipend starting at $150 per week. Additional housing stipend may be provided to offset high cost of living in certain locations.
    • Training/Research Allowance: Up to $250 to offset relevant costs, such as fees for submitting research for publication, access to relevant training, etc.

  •  

Project Catalog for the EERE Energy Storage Internships

Applicants submitting an application to the EERE Energy Storage Internship Program are required to select one to three projects. Review the list below to determine which projects you are most interested in for your internship. Submit your project preferences in the relevant section in your Zintellect application.

This project catalog will be updated throughout the application period. If you do not see any projects of interest to you, check back often for updates throughout the application period. All available projects will be finalized 2 weeks prior to the application deadline.

For technical assistance with navigating Zintellect, contact Zintellect Support at Zintellect@orau.org

Project Title Citizenship Required Reference Code Posted Date Posted Datetime Hosting Site Internship Location Description

Yes NREL-Santhanagopalan1 12/1/2021 1638334800000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Golden, CO

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

This project aims at improving the durability of these next generation batteries by investigating degradation of electrolytes in lithium-metal and lithium-sulfur cells: characterization will involve identification of chemical species that evolve at the interface via surface characterization (Raman), quantifying chemical signatures of soluble species (FTIR measurements). These results will be compared against heat signals measured on our calorimeters.  Based on test data, we will investigate different degradation mechanisms - such as the build-up of polysulfides, electrochemical decomposition, and mechanical failure of the sulfur cathodes. The intern will summarize the results in to a report and/or journal article, make presentations to the group.

Hosting Site:

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

Internship location: Golden, CO

Mentor:

  • Shriram Santhanagopalan
    Shriram.Santhanagopalan@nrel.gov
    303-275-3944

Internship Coordinator:

  • Geraly Amador
    geraly.amador@nrel.gov
    720-450-2764

Yes LLNL-Zhou1 12/1/2021 1638334800000 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Livermore, CA

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

This project is focused on applying the state-of-the-art machine learning models such as graph neural networks to study the evolution of dendrites.  Lithium dendrites are metallic microstructures that may form on the surface of the anode during charging and lead to severe problems such as battery failure through internal short circuits as well as battery capacity fading. This project will simulate the detailed kinetic process of dendrite growth, a problem requiring computational simulations on very large time and length scales. The participant will learn to use deep-learning methods and software platform such as PyTorch in a scientific machine learning setting, develop data-driven neural network models as surrogate model that operate on coarse-grained scales, and analyze the results to gain new physical insight.

Hosting Site:

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

Internship location: Livermore, CA

Mentor:

  • Fei Zhou
    zhou6@llnl.gov
    5107367438

Yes LLNL-Qian1 12/1/2021 1638334800000 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Livermore, CA

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

Methane is a far more dangerous greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide because methane warms our planet by 86 times as much as the latter. Methane is receiving increasing attention, as President Joe Biden just announced a fight against methane emissions at the crucial COP26 climate change meeting in 2021.

Our project develops novel bioreactor technology to biologically convert methane into valuable chemicals and liquid fuels for the reduction of methane emission while creating revenue. Technically, methane-consuming methanotrophs are embedded in a bio-compatible hydrogel and transformed into unique gas mass transfer-efficient geometries by state-of-the-art 3D printing techniques. In collaboration with others national labs, universities, biotech companies and local wastewater treatment plants, our invention exhibited 10s-fold of improvement in biocatalytic performance over prevailing stirred tank bioreactors and has been awarded over $2M research funds.

Due to its highly multi-disciplinary nature, our research provides various training in knowledge and experimental experience. Depending on individuals’ interest and career plans, students are welcomed to select one or more subjects as below.

  • Hydrogel encapsulation technology,
  • Microbial culture, biocatalysis measurement and bioproducts recovery,
  • Complex 3D geometry design using advanced engineering design tools,
  • 3D printing techniques, in particular direct ink writing and projection micro-stereolithography,
  • Communication with external collaborators to learn industrial demands and business models,
  • Skills in proposal writing, manuscript preparation and presentations.

Hosting Site:

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

Internship location: Livermore, CA

Mentors:

  • Fang Qian
    qian3@llnl.gov
    925-424-5634
  • Samantha Ruelas
    ruelas7@llnl.gov
    925-4233-2221

Internship Coordinator:

  • Lisa Palmer
    Palmer4@llnl.gov
    925-422-2408

Yes LLNL-Xia1 11/23/2020 1606107600000 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Livermore, CA

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

The student will have the opportunity to learn and use state-of-the-art additive manufacturing tools to design and fabricate 3D-architected current collectors for Li-ion batteries. 3D architectures with structural control down to the nano- and microscale are extremely important for next generation Li batteries with high energy density electrodes such as Li and Si. Rational 3D electrode design, enabled by additive manufacturing, can increase the energy and power density of batteries and improve their cycle life by mitigating mechanical degradation. The student will learn more about the electrochemistry of batteries, use CAD software to design electrode and current collector structures, fabricate samples using some of the most cutting edge 3D printers, and characterize the morphology and performance of the samples using scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, and electrochemical testing. The student will also learn to analyze their results and propose solutions to improve their electrode design iteratively. At the end of the project, the student will receive training on presenting their research by writing and oral presentation.

Hosting Site:

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

Internship location: Livermore, CA

Mentor:

  • Xiaoxing Xia
    xia7@llnl.gov

Internship Coordinator:

  • Elaine Lee
    lee1040@llnl.gov

Yes NREL-Rippy1 12/1/2021 1638334800000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Golden, CO

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

Concentrating solar power (CSP) is an exciting solar technology that generates electricity from sunlight. Unlike photovoltaics, CSP incorporates storage and thus can operate 24/7. Solar energy is stored in hot molten salts, which are used to run a power plant, much like coal or natural gas is used. Plants can be engineered to store enough hot salt to run the plant through the night. However, CSP energy is still more expensive than other sources of electricity. One reason is that the salts are corrosive. Thus, we have designed an electrochemical process to remove corrosive impurities from molten salts. This process could help facilitate higher temperature operation of concentrating solar power plants, which would lead to more efficient electricity production. It also could reduce maintenance costs and allow use of less expensive alloys for plant construction, lowering the levelized cost of electricity from CSP. We are now building a lab-scale demonstration of this purification cell.

Hosting Site:

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

Internship location: Golden, CO

Mentor:

  • Kerry Rippy
    kerry.rippy@nrel.gov
    19702746017

Yes ANL-Johnson1 12/1/2021 1638334800000 Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Lemont, IL

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

This project is focused on the synthesis and evaluation of new and novel cathode materials for Li-ion batteries based on earth-abundant elements, principally iron and manganese. 

Hosting Site:

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

Internship location: Lemont, IL

Mentor:

  • Christopher Johnson
    cjohnson@anl.gov
    cjohnson@anl.gov

Internship Coordinator:

  • Mariel Arredondo
    jomantm@anl.gov
    630-252-4371

Yes LLNL-Qian2 12/1/2021 1638334800000 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Livermore, CA

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

Description coming soon.

Hosting Site:

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

Internship location: Livermore, CA

Mentor:

  • Fang Qian
    qian3@llnl.gov
    925-424-5634

Yes LLNL-Ye1 12/1/2021 1638334800000 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Livermore, CA

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

All-solid-state lithium batteries using highly conductive, nonflammable solid-state electrolytes are promising to further improve energy density and address safety concerns. However, the manufacturing of ASSLBs is still far away from practical application; the battery performance is also limited by the ionic conductivity and interfacial stability. In this project, we aim to develop new experimental technologies to address manufacturing obstacles and improve battery performance. One of the promising technologies is the additive manufacturing, such as direct ink writing and laser powder-bed fusion. The students will have the opportunities to learn the manufacturing of ASSLBs, including powder synthesis and modification, ink preparation, 3D printing, and post processing. The students will also learn how to assemble batteries including coin cells, split cells, and pouch cells, and how to test and analyze battery performance. The students will be trained by postdocs and staff scientists with intense battery experience and will practice presentation and writing skills during the stay.

Hosting Site:

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

Internship location: Livermore, CA

Mentor:

  • Jianchao Ye
    Ye3@llnl.gov
    9254236696

Yes NREL-Booten1 12/7/2021 1638853200000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Golden, CO

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

Quantify the Technology Frontier for thermal innovation in buildings in two dimensions: thermal storage and thermal loadreductions. Also demonstrate thermal energy storage (TES) technical potential in buildings for meeting grid energy storage needs for aggressive renewable energy penetration scenarios. Project: Use Python to build upon existing modeling framework for sizing and dispatching energy storage (thermal and non-thermal) in buildings across the US. The theoretical limits of performance of storage and thermal load reduction in buildings will be quantified. Various electric grid scenarios will be investigated along with climate dependence, levels of renewable energy generation, ability of storage to meet heating and cooling needs, and performance characteristics of the storage (i.e. standby losses, dis/charging efficiency, etc.)

This project will teach how to simulate and analyze large-scale, time-resolved building thermal loads. These loads will be combined with aggregated, high-resolution renewable power generation data to estimate load/generation mismatches (i.e. the net load on the grid) which form the basis of estimating energy storage needs. This framework allows a theoretical exploration of power and storage capacity usefulness of thermal energy storage in buildings as well as other energy storage needs required for various electrical grid requirements from a climate zone up to national scale analysis. This analysis will be based on Python and requires knowledge of this programming language.

Hosting Site:

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

Internship location: Golden, CO

Mentor:

  • Chuck Booten
    chuck.booten@nrel.gov
    3032753167

Internship Coordinator:

  • Lorena Urbano
    lorena.urbano@nrel.gov
    303-384-6361

Yes NETL-Wang1 12/7/2021 1638853200000 National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

Thermal Energy storages (TES) is a key solution to improve power flexibility and grid stability. Thermochemical energy storage (TCES) is a promising new technology that stores energy in the form of chemical bonds using reversible redox reactions. TCES has the advantage of higher heat storage density, which is about 5-10 times higher than the latent and sensible heat storages respectively. The development of thermally-stable and redox-active materials with cycling stability is key in the TCES. Metal oxides such as CuO/Cu2O, Mn2O3/Mn3O4, Co3O4/CoO have shown suitable properties for TCES, but many challenges still remain based on the research in literature. Mixed metal oxides such as Mn-Fe have potential to improve the material characteristics. The project objective is to develop metal oxides and mixed metal oxides of Mn and Mn-Fe with high energy storage density, reaction kinetics and cycling stability. Therefore, the goal for the applicant would be synthesize and characterize these metal oxide materials and determine their effectiveness for TCES.

Hosting Site:

National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

Mentors:

  • Ping Wang
    ping.wang@netl.doe.gov
    412-386-7539
  • Nicholas Means
    Nicholas.Means@netl.doe.gov
    412-386-5847

Yes ANL-Chuang1 12/7/2021 1638853200000 Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Lemont, IL

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

The project aims to develop non-conventional experimental setup that utilize high energy synchrotron X-ray scattering and imaging techniques to study material behavior, primarily engineering alloys, under in-operando conditions. The student will learn to conduct material research using state-of-the-art x-ray characterization tools and interact with staff scientists at Argonne National Laboratory. Depending on the student's interest, they can select tasks that focus on data analysis, sample environment development, and/or material characterization.

Hosting Site:

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

Internship location: Lemont, IL

Mentor:

  • Andrew Chuang
    cchuang@anl.gov
    630-252-5891

Yes NREL-Odukomaiya1 12/7/2021 1638853200000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Golden, CO

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

This project focuses on the development of 3D-printable phase change material (PCM) composites for thermal energy storage (TES) in buildings. The research involves creating material formulations that are thermally conductive and incorporate PCMs, characterizing these materials, ensuring optimal printability, then utilizing 3D printers to print composite heat exchangers using these materials, and characterizing the resulting heat exchangers for their thermal and structural properties.

Hosting Site:

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

Internship location: Golden, CO

Mentor:

  • Wale Odukomaiya
    Wale.Odukomaiya@nrel.gov
    3036302420

Yes NREL-Woods1 11/23/2020 1606107600000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Golden, CO

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

Electric utilities build generation capacity to meet the highest demand period, and they often pass on the costs associated with these peaking generators to building owners through demand charges. Building owners can minimize these demand charges by shifting energy use away from peak periods with behind-the-meter storage. This storage can include batteries, which can directly shift the metered load, or thermal energy storage, which can shift thermal-driven electric loads like air conditioning. Battery costs are declining, but batteries still tend to be more expensive than a comparable thermal energy storage system due to higher capital expense and faster life-cycle degradation. In contrast, thermal storage uses less expensive materials than batteries and has the potential to have a lower first cost, but can only be used to address thermal loads. There is a lack of research on how best to combine battery and thermal energy storage to maximize renewable energy generation on the grid at the lowest cost to the utility or building owner.

NREL has explored some modeling to examine the tradeoffs between battery and thermal storage for a load-leveling application. This project will expand this modeling to explore how battery and thermal storage located at buildings can minimizing carbon emissions on the grid at the lowest cost in different regions, which have different climates and renewable generation type. The model will consist of simplified representations of batteries and thermal energy storage, and will take as inputs a building's electric and thermal load profile and the long-term and short-term marginal carbon dioxide emissions from an existing electric grid model. The outcome of this study will explore how the two storage types can be used to minimize the effective carbon emissions from a building by utilizing thermal and battery energy storage. The student will learn about these storage technologies, the impact of building loads on carbon emissions and the electric grid, and coordinated control logic for two types of storage systems.

Hosting Site:

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

Internship location: Golden, CO

Mentor:

  • Jason Woods
    jason.woods@nrel.gov
    7204419729

Yes LANL-Mehta1 12/7/2021 1638853200000 Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Los Alamos, NM

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

Microreactors are 4 kWt to 40 MWt compact, transportable nuclear reactors aimed to be used solo at remote sites, or in conjunction with renewables to provide 24-hour power throughput. The need for multiphysics tool and analysis is evident to model these novel reactors. The intern will have opportunity to work on either (i) development, or (ii) application side. The development side spans new methods and tools for advanced M&S. The application side consists of parametric studies of the space reactors to estimate their operation on extraterrestrial surfaces. A successful execution of project can lead to proceedings or journal paper.

Hosting Site:

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

Internship location: Los Alamos, NM

Mentor:

  • Vedant Mehta
    mehta@lanl.gov

Internship Coordinator:

  • Cassandra Casperson
    casperson@lanl.gov

Yes LANL-Jesse1 12/7/2021 1638853200000 Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Los Alamos, NM

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

Although photovoltaic power has grown substantially in the last decade, the intermittent nature has resulted in overgeneration risk in the very near term (2020 for California). To enhance grid stability and fully utilize solar farms, energy storage is needed. When the right geographical assets are available, pumped hydro is the most developed solution and currently represents 95% of the US's storage profile (23 GW). For areas without available land and water, we would like to develop inexpensive flow cells to store excess energy in soluble chemical species - at a lower price point than li-ion batteries (which are effective in certain applications, e.g. islands, where electricity is expensive, for < 4 h discharge). Our team develops the molecules which store energy (redox carriers), the medium with which they inhabit (electrolytes), and screens their performance with small-scale flow cells. One family of complexes studied was recently published in ChemSusChem (https://doi.org/10.1002/cssc.201802985) When you’re not learning new science in the lab, Los Alamos offers many outdoor activities in the summer – the hiking/mountain biking are fantastic in this area.

Hosting Site:

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

Internship location: Los Alamos, NM

Mentors:

  • Kate Jesse
    kjesse@lanl.gov
    5038670800
  • Benjamin Davis
    bldavis@lanl.gov
    5055002463

Internship Coordinator:

  • Cassandra Casperson
    casperson@lanl.gov
    5056674866

Yes LBNL-Liu1 12/7/2021 1638853200000 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Berkeley, CA

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

A strong demand for low-cost and high-energy-density rechargeable batteries has spurred lithium-sulfur (Li-S) rechargeable battery research. First, sulfur is an abundant and low-cost material. Second, the Gibbs energy of the lithium (Li) and sulfur reaction is approximately 2,600 Wh/kg, assuming the complete reaction of Li with sulfur to form Li2S, more than five times the theoretical energy of transition metal oxide cathode materials and graphite coupling. With these advantages, Li-S batteries could be both high energy density and low cost, satisfying demand in energy storage for transportation application. The major obstacle for sulfur cathode is the loss of sulfur cathode material as a result of polysulfide dissolution into common electrolytes, which causes a shuttle effect and significant capacity fade. The polysulfide shuttle effect leads to poor sulfur utilization and fast-capacity fade, which have hindered widespread use of rechargeable Li-S batteries. On the lithium electrode side, the lithium metal degradation through lithium dendrite formation during lithium deposition process. At Berkeley Lab, we are conducting a holistic investigation of the Li-S rechargeable battery from cathode electrode design, new electrolyte integration and lithium dendrite prevention.


The intern will be part of the larger team of graduate students, postdocs and staff to perform Li-sulfur battery investigation. The intern will be trained to make sulfur electrodes, use the new electrolytes to build Li-sulfur coin cells, and test cells, as well as perform data analysis. The intern will collaborate closely with a mentor in the team for day to day learning and research. The intern will provide weekly research update to the team and write periodic research reports. Depending on the progress, most interns in the past resulted in co-authorship in peer-reviewed journal articles after they finished internship.

Hosting Site:

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

Internship location: Berkeley, CA

Mentors:

  • Gao Liu
    gliu@lbl.gov
    510-486-7207
  • Chen Fang
    cfang@lbl.gov

Yes NREL-James1 12/7/2021 1638853200000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Golden, CO

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

Cost effective energy storage will be an integral component of a decarbonized energy economy. Consuming 75% of U.S. electricity generation, buildings hold the potential to support increased integration of renewable generation into the electrical grid via deployment of low-cost on-site energy storage. Buildings utilize energy in a variety of forms ranging from heating and cooling processes to electrical and mechanical work. The diverse nature of energy end uses in buildings allows for the application of multiple energy storage mechanisms to help increase load flexibility of buildings and improve their grid interactivity. Currently the primary forms of building sited energy storage consist of electrochemical batteries and ice-based thermal energy storage systems. Further research is needed to explore low-cost energy storage solutions which maximize utility to the building and its occupants.

This project will take advantage of a building’s need to provide multiple forms of energy end-uses to assess the potential of a hybrid electrical-latent energy storage device. By serving multiple end-uses, hybridized energy storage devices can increase the utilization of storage system hardware. This in turn can improve the economics of energy storage by making better use of capital expenditures. The student will expand on models developed at NREL to simulate the physical characteristics of the hybridized storage device and its energy storage potential. They will also explore different control schemes to optimize the environmental and economic benefits of the storage system. At the conclusion of this project the student will have gained experience in modeling thermo-fluid-mechanical systems and applying them to a practical energy storage technology for buildings.

Hosting Site:

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

Internship location: Golden, CO

Mentors:

  • Nelson James
    nelson.james@nrel.gov
  • Wale Odukomaiya
    adewale.odukomaiya@nrel.gov

Yes NETL-Oryshchyn1 12/7/2021 1638853200000 National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

Heat Pipes (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_pipe) can be used to increase and control heat-transfer into and out of thermal masses. This project will compare the performance of power systems which use thermal energy storage with and without the operation of heat-pipes. The intern's work through the summer will be to show how, and how much, taking control of the effective conductivity of a thermal mass contributes the flexibility of a power system and/or a combined heat & power system. The intern will learn the functional limits of heat-pipes and apply them to system models provided by the mentor. By applying heat-pipe behavior to these models, and by investigating design changes which would improve functionality or ease of operation, the intern will help define the merit and scope of adding a "conductivity control" to a power system using thermal energy storage.

Hosting Site:

National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

Mentor:

  • Dan Oryshchyn
    danylo.oryshchyn@netl.doe.gov
    (541)967-5865

Yes NETL-Shi1 12/7/2021 1638853200000 National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

In this study, we are going to offer a “big-data” tool that explores emerging trends in energy storage materials and technology and provides useful insight for future study.
In this study, Web of Science database and google scholar database will be used. More than 10,000 papers related to different energy storage materials and technology up to date are going to be analyzed using a python-coded program with natural language process tools. The most frequently used technical terms in titles and abstracts are listed via a complete text statistics analysis. Careful mining of these data reveals many useful information of energy storage materials and technologies, which can help in understanding their growth.
This study provides a great opportunity for researchers to use this data for developing useful knowledge and insights.

Hosting Site:

National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

Mentor:

  • Fan Shi
    fan.shi@netl.doe.gov
    4123867350

Internship Coordinator:

  • Patricia Adkins-Coliane
    Patricia.Adkins-Coliane@netl.doe.gov
    412-386-5388

Yes LLNL-Wan1 12/7/2021 1638853200000 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Berkeley, CA

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

This project focuses on examining Li-ion transport phenomena at the interfaces in all solid-state lithium batteries. First-principles based simulations in combination with machine-learning models will be used to understand Li-ion transport mechanisms at complex interfaces and predict Li-ion transport coefficients as a function of local chemistry and structures.

Hosting Site:

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

Internship location: Berkeley, CA

Mentor:

  • Liwen Wan
    wan6@llnl.gov
    9254223490

Internship Coordinator:

  • Ashley Mata
    mata5@llnl.gov
    9254227249

Yes NETL-Zhang1 12/7/2021 1638853200000 National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

NETL has recently developed a viscometer for the measurement of formation fluid in subsurface. The formation fluid could include oil, gas, water, CO2, and the mixture of them. Knowing the rheologic behave of the fluid is important for resource evaluation and risk assessment. These formation fluids often of very low viscosity and under extreme pressure and temperature conditions and with multiphase structure. Viscosity measurement for extreme high pressure high temperature and very low viscosity is therefore needed. NETL has made a falling magnet ball viscometer that has potential to address the above issue. This project is to evaluate the theory and experimental aspects of this new viscosity measurement.  Study will include understanding of the force field, and the interaction of the ball with sample. The forces involved include gravitational force, buoyancy, magnet force, shear stress and perhaps turbulent force. Experiments will be conducted to valid and modify, if needed, the model so far established. The research will also involve skills to use I/O interface with Labview, and analyze data with Matlab.

Hosting Site:

National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

Mentor:

  • Wu Zhang
    wu.zhang@netl.doe.gov
    3046858192

Yes LANL-Graham1 12/15/2021 1639544400000 Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Los Alamos, NM

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

Candidate will utilize industry software tools such as SketchUp and SkySpark to enhance the user interface experience through graphical enhancements. Project will also include data analytics through virtual metering for energy usage. A background in Electrical Engineering with computer programming a plus.

Hosting Site:

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

Internship location: Los Alamos, NM

Mentor:

  • Leonard Graham
    lgraham@lanl.gov
    505-667-8155

Yes NETL-Duan1 12/15/2021 1639544400000 National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

I. Project Purpose and Objective
Once H2 is produced from methane reforming methods coupled with CO2 capture, efficient storage and transportation methods are needed before it can be used. Currently, there are several possible storage and transportation methods for H2, such as tank storage & pipeline transport under high pressure, or transformation of H2 into carriers such as metal hydrides (MHx), formic acid (CH3OH) or ammonia (NH3). The energy densities of MHx and NH3 are compatible with coal. In addition to their potential as hydrogen carriers, metal hydrides can be used for smart-grid energy storage, neutron moderation, electrochemical cycling, thermal storage, heat pumps, and purification/separation. Transforming gas phase H2 into liquid (NH3) and/or solids (MHx) are game-change technologies for H2 storage & transportation.
In this study, combining atomistic-level simulations with machine-learning (ML) techniques, we will computationally search and synthesize metals and their alloys as H2 carriers which have better performance in terms of H2 storage capability, energy consumption, transportation, and release of H2. The targeted material systems will be implemented in stationary power applications such as fuel cells or concentrating solar power plants that can meet the goal set by the Department of Energy.
II. Benefits and Justification:
Production of efficient, decarburized H2 from domestic natural gas supplies and storage it into MHx carriers: Solid state MHx possesses advantages such as easy to store and transport hydrogen, superior gravimetric and volumetric energy densities, low operating cost. In particular, solid-state hydrogen storage under moderate temperature and pressure provide the important safety advantage over the gas and liquid storage methods in both transportation and stationary power applications, where in the latter case the gas and thermal managements can be integrated to further boost the overall efficiency. Benefits from the metal hydride R&D for hydrogen storage can come from multiple revenue streams, including grid services and emerging markets, such as backup power systems and fuel cells, that provide demand in the near term (https://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy15osti/62518.pdf).
III. Major R&D Challenges:
   Current research focuses of the metal hydride materials for hydrogen storage include improving the volumetric and gravimetric capacities, hydrogen absorption/desorption kinetics, reaction thermodynamics, and long-term stability of potential material candidates, which are mainly driven by insufficient understanding about the basic physical and chemical properties of metal hydrides, in particular, under their reactive conditions as well as upon tuning the thermodynamic and kinetic properties through nano-engineering. Thanks to recent advances in computational power and the emergence of supercomputers that enabled various modeling approaches at different length and time scales for various phenomena in metal hydrides, theoretical modeling play a critical role in elucidating phenomena associated with thermodynamics and kinetics of metal hydrides. Yet, development of metal hydride materials with hydrogen capacity meeting or surpassing the DOE target has not been identified (https://www.energy.gov/eere/fuelcells/metal-hydride-storage-materials).
IV. Our approach
We propose to develop a ML approach that relies upon established experimental and theoretical evidences to gain a comprehensive understanding and boost MHx design. The essence of this approach will be to assess materials’ optimal performance for H2 storage. The predicted promising MHx will be validated by experimental measurements and the overall performance will be further evaluated by process modeling. For FY22 internship summer project, as part of our ongoing efforts we propose two tasks: (1) develop a MHx database; (2) Develop a machine-learning model to select and design MHx with high performance for H2 storage.

Hosting Site:

National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

Mentor:

  • Yuhua Duan
    yuhua.duan@netl.doe.gov
    412-386-5771

Yes LLNL-Wan2 12/15/2021 1639544400000 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Berkeley, CA

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

This project focuses on predicting interfacial degradation in energy related systems, such as batteries and solar cells. A combination or subsets of the modeling techniques/tools, including density functional theory, cluster expansion, (hybrid) Molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo, kinetic Monte Carlo and machine-learning models, will be used to explore the configurational space of interfaces and study the kinetics of phase evolutions and degradation under various synthetic and operating conditions. The theoretical predictions of interfacial structure and chemistry will be directly compared with the state-of-the-art experimental characterization of interfaces.

Hosting Site:

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

Internship location: Berkeley, CA

Mentor:

  • Liwen Wan
    wan6@llnl.gov
    9254223490

Internship Coordinator:

  • Ashley Mata
    mata5@llnl.gov
    (925) 422-7249

Yes NETL-Gamwo1 12/27/2021 1640581200000 National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

Energy storage density is a critical parameter for grid-scale energy storage systems. This project will evaluate the thermodynamic limit of emerging flow battery chemistries being developed to support the national grid.

Project activities include surveying new flow battery chemistries, documenting their fundamental thermodynamic parameters and modeling energy storage density limitations.

Hosting Site:

National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

Mentor:

  • Isaac Gamwo
    isaac.gamwo@netl.doe.gov
    412-386-6537

Internship Coordinator:

  • Patricia Adkins-Coliane
    patricia.adkins-coliane@netl.doe.gov
    412-386-5388

Yes NREL-Santhanagopalan2 12/27/2021 1640581200000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Golden, CO

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

This project aims at improving the durability of these next generation batteries by investigating degradation of electrolytes in lithium-metal and lithium-sulfur cells: characterization will involve identification of chemical species that evolve at the interface via surface characterization (Raman), quantifying chemical signatures of soluble species (FTIR measurements). These results will be compared against heat signals measured on our calorimeters. Based on test data, we will investigate different degradation mechanisms - such as the build-up of polysulfides, electrochemical decomposition, and mechanical failure of the sulfur cathodes. The intern will summarize the results in to a report and/or journal article, make presentations to the group.

Hosting Site:

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

Internship location: Golden, CO

Mentor:

  • Shriram Santhanagopalan
    Shriram.Santhanagopalan@nrel.gov
    303-275-3944

Internship Coordinator:

  • Geraly Amador
    geraly.amador@nrel.gov
    720-450-2764

Yes NETL-Wright1 11/23/2020 1606107600000 National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

This summer project is focused on investigation of zinc anode materials for zinc-air batteries, including chemical composition and coating modification. Zinc–air batteries are promising as energy storage systems with the advantages of low cost, high safety, environmental friendliness, and large theoretical energy density. However, there are challenges on zinc anodes including passivation, dendrite growth and hydrogen evolutional which limit the practical applications and scale-up of zinc–air batteries. This project consists of two main parts: literature review and experimental studies on zinc anode improvement for Zn-air batteries.

Hosting Site:

National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

Mentor:

  • Ruishu Wright
    ruishu.wright@netl.doe.gov
    412-386-5018

Internship Coordinator:

  • Patricia Adkins-Coliane
    Patricia.Adkins-Coliane@NETL.DOE.GOV
    412.386.5388

Yes LBNL-Zhou1 01/6/2022 1641445200000 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Berkeley, CA

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

This project aims to design an actionable framework for policymakers and manufacturers to perform a life-cycle evaluation of the ramifications of energy storage, in particular battery storage. When batteries are manufactured and deployed, they enable a greener and more reliable power grid, as well as expanding the ownership of electric vehicles. Battery storage involves several downsides, however. Manufacturing battery storage requires lithium and cobalt, which currently are sourced from countries such as DR Congo, Argentina, and Chile, where child labor, weakened land, and water usage have raised serious concerns. In addition, the benefits of battery storage are available primarily to higher-income households. Then, at the end of their life, most lithium batteries end up in landfills, producing potential fire risks and air pollution in neighborhoods that typically are home to minority and lower-income families. The complex social injustices integral to battery storage are difficult to evaluate and may be imperceptible to stakeholders. Because energy justice is an emerging area of research, no robust evaluation framework has been developed to help decision makers mitigate the negative effects of battery storage. Designing an actionable, justice-focused index will help provide that the benefits of battery storage outweigh the social and environmental consequences.

Hosting Site:

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

Internship location: Berkeley, CA

Mentors:

  • Nan Zhou
    nzhou@lbl.gov
    5104865534
  • Jingjing Zhang
    jingjingzhang@lbl.gov
    5103333422

Internship Coordinator:

  • Gao Liu
    GLiu@lbl.gov
    5104867207

Yes NETL-Ramazani1 01/14/2022 1642136400000 National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

The rapidly growing demand in high energy-density batteries requires to explore new electrode materials that can be thinner, lighter and even more mechanically flexible, and deliver higher energy capacity. Two-dimensional (2D) materials, specifically MXenes, have garnered enthusiasm due to their fascinating electronic, optical, mechanical, and chemical properties, and high Li storage ability. The current proposal aims to develop 2D high entropy MXene (HEM) as high-capacity anode material for Li-ion batteries. Since HEMs have four, five or even more transition metals (a range of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metal elements) in their structures, we will be able to control local order and disorder, electronic properties, charge density, active adsorption sites, and ion transport in the material, and enhance the functionality of the designed HEM, which can result in the improvement of the battery performance. Our focus on HEM phases will be on the high-entropy transition-metal carbides. In addition, we will optimize the carbon composition in our developed HEMs to (i) eliminate surface functionalization, which is required for using Mxene as anode, and (ii) greatly improve the battery performance.

In the current proposal, we aim to use first principle electronic structure calculations to study the feasibility of 2D HEMs to serve as high-capacity anode materials for Li-ion batteries. The Monte-Carlo simulations will be performed to explore structures of the designed HEMs. We will employ DFT calculations to compute the formation energies and explore synthesizability of these high-entropy MAX phases. We will then perform DFT computations to investigate the electronic properties, mechanical, and thermal stability of HEMs. The effect of composition on the adsorption of Li atoms on the surface of the electrodes will be studied. In addition, the specific capacity, diffusion energy barrier, and open-circuit-voltage (OCV) will be calculated with constructing composition-property relationships. The highly reversible Li through the confined 2D configuration of HEMs can reduce the dead Li and electrolyte consumption by forming a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer. The DFT and AIMD simulations will be done to simulate the SEI formation and growth, and its electronic and mechanical properties, which is of great importance to improve the suppression of Li densities and enhance the functionality of the battery.

This project will provide a strategy to design new, novel and reliable 2D anode materials to improve the performance of Li-ion batteries.

Hosting Site:

National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

Mentors:

  • Ali Ramazani
    ali.ramazani@netl.doe.gov
    412-386-5117
  • Yuhua Duan
    yuhua.duan@netl.doe.gov
    412-386-5771

Internship Coordinator:

  • Patricia Adkins-Coliane
    patricia.adkins-coliane@netl.doe.gov
    412-386-5388

Yes NETL-Ramazani2 01/14/2022 1642136400000 National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

Three-dimensional graphene aerogel (GA) is the world's lightest material with porous structure and made of aggregated graphene sheets and possesses excellent mechanical, electronic, and thermal conductivity properties. Developing such lightweight aerogels with tunable properties enable higher energy density batteries by replacing the heavier metallic electrodes used in the current batteries. This increase in energy density is expected to allow a higher energy output for a given battery size/weight without sacrificing the energy output. The current proposal aims to computationally design and fabricate porous, and ultralight-weight GAs to replace the state-of -the-art metallic electrodes.

In the first step, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations will be utilized to develop GAs with different pore size and density. Our previous studies showed that the properties of GA strongly depend on the pore size and density, and by controlling these features, we can tune their properties and enhance their functionality. The developed structures will be characterized and their structural and physical properties will be identified. In the second step, the diffusion of Li-ions in the designed GAs, electrical properties, and mechanical properties (under different boundary conditions) will be investigated using ab-initio MD (AIMD) and MD simulations using reactive force fields. We will try to understand the mechanism of lithium insertion and the interaction between Li and the electrode, and its effect on the mechanical properties and failure behavior of the electrode. The researcher will quantify the deformation behavior of the GA electrodes as a function of Li concentration, and understand the mechanisms underlying the eventual delamination of the GA electrode from the current collector after a number of charge- discharge cycles. In the third step, using MD simulation, the solid electrolyte interphase (SIE) formation between GA electrodes and the electrolyte will be studied using MD, and AIMD simulations. The researcher will elucidate the properties of the SEI, and understand how this interphase layer influences the lithiation-deformation behavior of GA electrodes. At the end, the mechanical and electronic properties of the developed SEI layer will be predicted using MD and AIMD simulations to discover the relationship between electrochemical performance, SEI structure and electrode properties.

The research will provide a strategy to construct high-performance nano- and micro-architected ultralight electrodes for the next generation of Li-ion batteries.

Hosting Site:

National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

Mentors:

  • Ali Ramazani
    ali.ramazani@netl.doe.gov
    412-386-5117
  • Yuhua Duan
    yuhua.duan@netl.doe.gov
    412-386-5771

Internship Coordinator:

  • Patricia Adkins-Coliane
    patricia.adkins-coliane@netl.doe.gov
    412-386-5388

Yes NETL-Gamwo2 01/14/2022 1642136400000 National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

Low-grade thermal energy is a large untapped potential resource that goes unused because it is both technically and economically challenging to harness. However, recent developments in electrochemical energy conversion systems have provided opportunities to extract electric power from thermal energy at low temperatures (T< 100 C). This project will determine then compare the thermodynamic efficiencies of emerging technologies proposed to address this technical gap based on currently published data. Project activities include surveying new low-grade thermoelectric power generation methods, documenting their fundamental thermodynamic parameters and modeling their thermodynamic efficiencies.

Hosting Site:

National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

Mentor:

  • Isaac Gamwo
    isaac.gamwo@netl.doe.gov
    412-386-6537

Internship Coordinator:

  • Patricia Adkins-Coliane
    patricia.adkins-coliane@netl.doe.gov
    412-386-5388

Yes NETL-Duan2 01/14/2022 1642136400000 National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

As both the quantum hardware and software communities continue to make rapid progress while our understanding of quantum computers continues to mature, the immediate role of quantum computing for quantum chemistry becomes much clearer. The challenge is that to advance the quantum algorithms for quantum chemistry requires the synergy of quantum information theory and classical quantum chemistry techniques. Currently, the existing quantum algorithms are still in early stage of their developments for predicting the electronic structures and properties of molecules. Hence, this project will involve development of a module for benchmarking, implementing, and validating the developed quantum computing (QC) codes to simulate vibrational spectra and thermodynamic properties of molecules on noisy quantum simulators for the energy applications at NETL.

In addition to electronic energies of chemical systems, many chemistry applications need properties beyond electronic energies, such as vibrational property measurements for identifying fingerprints of molecules, adsorbates, reaction intermediates, etc. The framework for the calculation of ground and excited state energies of bosonic systems such as the vibrational structures of a CO2 molecule has been recently demonstrated with the Qiskit QC code and near-term quantum devices (P. J. Olltraut et al. Chem. Sci. 11(2020)6842-55; E. Lötstedt et al, Phys. Rev. A, 103(2021)062609; M. Majland et al, arxiv: 2102.11886). Development of QC code for calculating vibrational properties of chemical systems of interests can be a parallel task in addition to the electronic energy calculations (N. P. D. Sawaya et al, arXiv: 2009.05066). In this project, by developing QC codes, the vibrational spectra and thermodynamic properties of various relevant molecules (e. g. CO2, NH3, CH4) and building blocks of larger molecules will be simulated and will further extend to anharmonic systems or more complex systems (e. g. polymeric chain and MOFs), which will further expand the capability of the QC code for simulating chemistry systems of interests at NETL. At the end of this project, the trainee will be able to build a framework to calculate the vibrational properties of bosonic systems and conduct quantum computing on the electronic and thermodynamic properties of small molecular systems.

Hosting Site:

National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

Mentors:

  • Yuhua Duan
    yuhua.duan@netl.doe.gov
    412-386-5771
  • Yueh-Lin Lee
    Yueh-Lin.Lee@netl.doe.gov
    412-386-5891

Internship Coordinator:

  • Patricia Adkins-Coliane
    Patricia.Adkins-Coliane@netl.doe.gov
    412-386-5388

Yes NETL-Paudel1 01/14/2022 1642136400000 National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

U.S. Citizenship is a requirement for this internship

Project Description:

Developing quantum information science (QIS) capability is one of the most urgent tasks the DOE faces to make sure the U.S. wins the quantum race. To address QIS for energy applications, we must take action to participate the 2nd quantum wave to advance our computational capability. QIS is creating a potential transformative opportunities to exploit the intricate quantum mechanical phenomena in new ways for obtaining and processing information to advance many areas of science and engineering. The QIS contains four pillars: quantum computing, quantum simulations, quantum sensing, and quantum networking. To apply QIS in energy related applications, the key is to develop the capability of quantum computing & simulation tools. It is a great opportunity for NETL to support DOE in this quest of quantum race, while enabling the development of path breaking applications of QIS in energy technology development, particular to the decarbonization in fossil energy.

Existing quantum algorithms are still in early stage of their developments for electronic structure predictions. There is an opportunity to collaborate on the existing efforts to optimized and develop improved algorithms for efficient calculations of electronic properties and reaction kinetics. In this project, we propose to enhance the capability of quantum algorithms for molecular property calculations of system of molecules such as CO2, NH3, and CH4. In addition, we further propose to implement quantum algorithms to predict the chemical properties of other hydrocarbon systems. We will begin with benchmarking the available quantum algorithms and computational resources by using simple molecular systems. The targeted systems under study will be chosen from the NETL’s use case problems. We will implement state-of-the-art quantum simulator (e. g. IBM qiskit, QC-DMET) installed at the NETL supercomputer to simulate the environments of quantum computer. At the end of this project, trainee will be able to conduct quantum computing research for electronic and chemical property calculations of simpler molecular systems.

Hosting Site:

National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

Mentors:

  • Hari Paudel
    hari.paudel@netl.doe.gov
    407-535-1570
  • Yuhua Duan
    yuhua.duan@netl.doe.gov

Internship Coordinator:

  • Hari Paudel
    hari.paudel@netl.doe.gov
    407-535-1570

No llnl-wood1 01/17/2022 1642395600000 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Livermore, CA

Project Description:

Solid-state batteries have the potential to revolutionize energy storage by providing significantly higher energy densities and improved safety compared to conventional Li-ion batteries. However, robust high-capacity Li metal anodes are required to realize this technology. Current Li metal anode designs suffer from significant degradation over time at high charging rates due to non-uniform Li plating/stripping and loss of contact with the solid electrolyte during cycling. Carbon scaffold hosts have been shown to mitigate this problem in liquid electrolyte systems by providing abundant Li nucleation sites and creating a uniform electric field that helps eliminate current density hotspots, but they have not been well explored in solid-state systems.  This project is focused on investigating the effects of scaffold architecture and chemistry on the resulting Li morphology and anode performance by varying the porosity, tortuosity, and interface chemistry of a carbon/solid polymer electrolyte scaffold.  Understanding the relationship between these design parameters, Li morphology, and electrochemical performance will help advance the development of stable Li metal anodes for safer, high-energy-density solid-state batteries with fast charging times.

Depending on the background of the applicant, internship activities could include: 3D printing carbon materials, developing polymer electrolyte formulations, and/or assembling coin cells and testing their electrochemical performance. 

Hosting Site:

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

Internship location: Livermore, CA

Mentor:

  • Marissa Wood
    wood70@llnl.gov
    925-423-6029

The name and contact information of the hosting site internship coordinator is provided for further assistance with questions regarding the hosting site; local housing availability, cost, or roommates; local transportation; security clearance requirements; internship start and end dates; and other administrative issues specific to that research facility. If you contact the internship coordinator, identify yourself as an applicant to the NSF Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship (MSGI) Program.

Interns will not enter into an employee/employer relationship with the Hosting Site, ORAU/ORISE, EERE or DOE. No commitment with regard to later employment is implied or should be inferred.